Germany planning annual tests following emission scandal 0

A yearly treat in the form of a surprise test is to be sprung on vehicles; sort of like the opposite of Christmas for car makers.

Following the Volkswagen emissions scandal that sent sales of Volkswagen vehicles down worldwide, caused a ripple effect on diesel cars made by all different companies and destroyed trust in the automobile industry as a whole the German government have expressed their desire to introduce unannounced tests on automobiles each year, similar to the surprise drug testing on professional athletes.

Germany planning annual tests following emission scandal

source: sirjoeworks.com

Wanting to reverse the damage done to the reputation of German manufacturers, Transport Minister Alexander Dobrindt told German newspaper Bild that they have proposed a plan that will include ” controls on vehicles in the style of doping tests [for athletes]…Unannounced and every year.” A draft of the proposal is predicted to go in front of the Bundestag lower house of parliament at some point this month. It is expected that the scheme would involve different models being selected at random from car rental companies, which would then be tested on by specialist technicians who would be rotated to avoid bribery or potential corruption… Not that we’re suggesting anyone would do such a thing, of course.

Though it may seem quite drastic, the impact of the emissions scandal runs deep. There is a temporary sales ban on Volkswagen diesel vehicles throughout America, the estimated amount of vehicles involved in the scandal has reached a total of 11 million and Volkswagen had their market value wiped of billions. Consumers felt betrayed, and we have previously reported that a poll in America revealed an 18 percent loss in trust for German manufacturers as a whole.

By taking these steps, the actions and dealings of carmakers will become more accessible to the public and hopefully clear some of the polluted airs between company and consumer. So, perhaps, these surprise tests will end up being a gift to a beleaguered and unpopular industry after all.