Volvo plans to cheat death by 2020 0

Volvo have announced their ambitious plan to make their cars ‘death proof’ in the next four years… anyone else having flashbacks to that scene in Titanic when they kept calling the ship ‘unsinkable’?

Matt Chinworth

Matt Chinworth

Since their 2007 announcement of advancing their technological innovation to improve the safety of their vehicles, Volvo are just one of the automobile companies continuously been rolling out and testing autonomous driving features that are revolutionising the industry. In a bold move though, a move so bold that we like to think makes them the ‘Kanye West of wheels’, Volvo have one-upped the promises, reporting that they have the plan to make their vehicles death proof.

Features that could make these claims less incredulous than cynics might initially think (guilty) include pedestrian detection software that detect if there are any people nearby and alerting the driver if they are too close. An updated take on this quite common autonomous driving software will have the car automatically brake to avoid a collision if there is no time to alert the driver of a pedestrian. A cyclist detection software acts in much the same way, and there is now the option of animal detection software for detecting larger animals on country roads/in remote areas. We have previously written about the rise in driverless cars and the software that comes with it so these are not necessarily new ideas. The idea is to implement each updated and improved version into a robust and reliable car. Sensors, for example, are now being tested to not simply check for road blocks or physical objects but to also alert the driver if they are potentially veering outside of their lane and calculate a safe speed and distance in which to travel in relation to nearby vehicles. Volvo will also implement the use of airbags that deploy outside of the vehicle for use of a passenger in case of collision, reducing the intensity of any injury.

Image credit: giphy.com

Image credit: giphy.com

By merging existing ideas and synchronising them with their own tweaks and improvements, Volvo’s claims of making their cars death proof are actually becoming plausible. 2015 data from the Institute for Highway Safety shows that no one in the United States died in a Volvo XC90 between 2009 and 2012. Completely death proof cars will be a difficult thing to accomplish, but with technological boundaries being constantly pushed Volvo find themselves leading the race in making it possible.